The Left Will Never Accept Outsiders.

Robert Massimi.

It’s like being back in College with those liberal professors, if someone in class was not on the left of loony, teachers often ostracized them and held it against there grade. The left only wants to hear there side and there point of view, no one else. I remember when the Republican convention was in NYC, how the left pushed women going to see a show, calling them bitches. The left sees what they do as right no matter how wrong it is. I laugh when liberals tell me that they are accepting people, nothing could be further from the truth. I could list a million examples like the college professor who called for “some muscle” on the college campus when a student did not want to leave the safe zone on campus or when Harvard University held a sit in because a white was elected president.

Chick Fil a has the right to do business in NYC or anywhere it chooses, to call them creepy because the owner is religious is not only stupid, it is an infringement on religious freedoms. The left is famous for taking away your rights ie guns, free speech. Bloomberg the former mayor was famous for this, he all but banned smoking, soft drinks and salt. When the liberals come off as a free belief, don’t believe them; the left has always been about control there way only, your opinion doesn’t count.

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Culture

I’m Not Religious, and I Eat Chick-fil-A

People line up outside a Chick-fil-A restaurant in Manhattan in 2015. (Carlo Allegri/Reuters)

Yes, Chick-fil-A’s CEO is a Christian. So what?The New Yorker published an essay by Dan Piepenbring condemning Chick-fil-A’s existing in New York City — claiming that its “Christian traditionalism” makes the presence of the chain feel like a “creepy infiltration.”

Chick-fil-A’s “headquarters, in Atlanta, is adorned with Bible verses and a statue of Jesus washing a disciple’s feet,” Piepenbring continues. “Its stores close on Sundays.”

(Oh the horror!)

Piepenbring also explains that Chick-fil-A’s CEO, Dan Cathy, is opposed to gay marriage and that in the past he has donated to groups that oppose gay marriage.

Personally, I’m not religious. So . . . do I feel like this Christian-owned chicken chain is infiltrating my city? Do I associate the smell of its fried food with bigotry and hate?

Nope. I associate it with chicken. Piepenbring may attest that Chick-fil-A’s locations in New York City feel like an “infiltration,” but to me, it just feels like I can get a delicious sandwich only one block from my office. I can have that sweet chicken biscuit in the morning and that delectable lunch sandwich, with extra pickles, in the afternoon.

Let me be clear: I say all of this as someone who supports gay rights. To say that I disagree strongly with the view that homosexuality is immoral would be an understatement. I absolutely do believe that gay people should be able to get married; I don’t think that the government should have the power to tell any consenting adults that they can’t get married. I also sometimes like to eat some chicken.

For what it’s worth, Cathy has also made it clear that he respects people regardless of their sexual orientation. According to a statement on Chick-fil-A’s official Facebook page:

“The Chick-fil-A culture and service tradition in our restaurants is to treat every person with honor, dignity and respect — regardless of their belief, race, creed, sexual orientation or gender.”

Yes — Cathy is a Christian. So what? So are millions and millions of other Americans. I may not be one of them; however, just as I expect other people to respect my beliefs and not discount my humanity because of those beliefs, I also feel that other people deserve that same respect.

The fact that there’s a restaurant chain in my city that’s owned by someone who feels differently than I do is just not that big of a deal.

What’s more, the legality of gay marriage has already been decided by the courts. Although Cathy may have donated to organizations that lobbied against its legalization in the past, the fact is that it now is legal, and that isn’t going to change. If my eating sandwiches from one of Cathy’s restaurants was actually going to somehow contribute to gay marriage becoming illegal, then I wouldn’t eat them, but that isn’t the case — so why shouldn’t I?

The truth is, the fact that there’s a restaurant chain in my city that’s owned by someone who feels differently than I do is just not that big of a deal. After all, as a small-l libertarian, if I allowed myself to eat food only from establishments where the owners agreed with all of my beliefs, then I’d probably starve.

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Author: nobullwithragingrobert

Was a drama critic at Manhattan College. Wrote professionally for Bergen News, Sun Bulletin . Alpha Sigma Lambda, Beta Theta. Has seen over 600 shows worldwide, has published both on Theater and Politics. Avid reader on many subjects and writers. Chief Drama critic for Metropolitan magazine. Writes for Jerrick media, American conservative, The City Journal and Reason magazine. Has produced shows both on and off Broadway.

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