Miller On Trade and Immigration. Robert Massimi.

 

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A rising White House power: true-believer Stephen Miller

Stephen Miller at the White House press briefing room podium. Photo: Chip Somodevilla / Getty

Guess who’s likely to stick around for all four or eight years, and will be empowered in 2018? Stephen Miller, the true-believer senior policy adviser, who trumps Trump on hardline immigration views — and may outlast almost everyone.

  • The two issues Miller cares and knows most about, immigration and trade, will be front and center.
  • And Miller channels (and believes) Trump campaign rhetoric more than anyone internally.
  • Although some of Miller’s allies speculate that he could one day wind up as chief of staff, he’s seen more as an advocate and adviser than manager or leader. He works super-hard, but doesn’t delegate.

Some West Wing officials are putting pressure on economic adviser Gary Cohn to stay: He would be vital to a push for a big infrastructure package, one of the year’s policy centerpieces. And he’s a crucial goalie on trade.

  • But Wall Street sources tell us Cohn may depart.
  • Deputy National Security Adviser Dina Powell — like Cohn, a major moderating influence — has said she’s leaving early next year.
  • Finding big establishment names to replace them will be hard, especially with the tax cut already in the win column.
  • If National Security Adviser H.R. McMaster leaves in the dominoes that would follow the expected departure of Secretary of State Rex Tillerson, one possible replacement is hardliner John Bolton, who was U.S. ambassador to the U.N. under President George W. Bush.

Among key advisers likely to stay:

  • Chief of Staff John Kelly, who has imposed order and seems to enjoy running the place, despite occasional frustrations with the boss.
  • Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin, who is good at engaging Trump in briefings.
  • Defense Secretary James Mattis, a moderate voice in Situation Room meetings.
  • Communications Director Hope Hicks, the closest adviser — period.
  • Staff Secretary Rob Porter, respected for his intellect and instincts.
  • Marc Short, the legislative affairs director, coming off the big tax-cut win.
  • Nick Ayers, chief of staff to Vice President Pence.

Go deeper … “Scoop: White House reshuffle expected in new year,” by Jonathan Swan:

Featured

South Korea moves against Bitcoin

Illustration: Rebecca Zisser / Axios

South Korea has proposed legislation that would prohibit South Korean entities from providing settlement services to complete cryptocurrency transactions, per The Verge. The country also handed down rules earlier this year that restrict cryptocurrency investments by financial firms. And South Korea’s government has hinted that it might want to ban cryptocurrency exchanges entirely in the future.

Why it matters: It’s a sign that developed nations with strict monetary controls are becoming hyper-aware of the implications of an uncontrolled cryptocurrency market. But while nations could make it difficult for their citizens to interact and do business with cryptocurrency by implementing regulations preventing interactions with traditional financial institutions, it might be impossible to ever completely cut off access.

Featured

Behind the scenes: choosing the new 💩💁😂

There’s 🍞, 🥐 and 🥖, but where’s the bagel? AP Tech Writer Barbara Ortutay looks at the emoji approval process (complete with lobbying and campaigning).

How can our emotional vocabulary be complete without a teddy bear, a lobster, a petri dish or a tooth?

  • “These are the kind of questions that trigger heated debates … among members of the group burdened with deciding which new emojis make it onto our phones and computer screens each year.”
  • “The Unicode Consortium is tasked with setting the global standard for the icons. … The nonprofit group [is] mostly made up of people from large tech companies like Apple, Google and Facebook.”
  • Why it matters: “Not since the printing press has something changed written language as much as emojis have, says Lauren Collister, a scholarly communications librarian at the University of Pittsburgh. ‘Emoji is one way language is growing.'”
  • Former N.Y. Times reporter Jennifer 8. Lee “didn’t understand how there could be no dumpling. … The process took almost two years, including research, many meetings and a written, illustrated proposal that reads a bit like an academic paper, complete with research on dumpling history and popularity.”
  • “But thanks largely to her efforts, the 🥟 was added to the Unicode Standard this year. “

Featured

Trump just fired the entire White House HIV/AIDS council

An LA protest in 2009. Photo: David McNew / Getty

There is currently no Presidential Advisory Council on HIV/AIDS as President Trump fired the last 16 members on Wednesday, the Daily Beast reports. Six other members had resigned in June.

A grain of salt: Trump had renewed the council’s brief through next year and PACHA advisor Gabriel Maldonado told the WashingtonBlade, “Like any administration, they want their own people there. Many of us were Obama appointees. I was an Obama appointee and my term was continuing until 2018.”

Reaction: Scott Schoettes, a former PACHA member who resigned in June, tweeted: “Remaining #HIV/AIDS council members booted by @realDonaldTrump. No respect for their service. Dangerous that #Trump and Co. (Pence esp.) are eliminating few remaining people willing to push back against harmful policies, like abstinence-only sex ed. #WeObject #PACHA6 #Resist”

Author: nobullwithragingrobert

Was a drama critic at Manhattan College. Wrote professionally for Bergen News, Sun Bulletin . Alpha Sigma Lambda, Beta Theta. Has seen over 600 shows worldwide, has published both on Theater and Politics. Avid reader on many subjects and writers. Chief Drama critic for Metropolitan magazine. Writes for Jerrick media, American conservative, The City Journal and Reason magazine. Has produced shows both on and off Broadway.

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